10 Best VST Reverb Plugins You should Use in 2021

Reverb is one of the most essential tools for producers. It’s an audio effect utilized on every mix you’ll ever hear.

There are so many reverb plugins out there. Picking which one to use is challenging. And combing across dozens of plugins may drain your creativity fast.

However, if you find your way around the different sorts of reverb plugins, you’ll have a jumpstart on picking the correct tools to create the ideal atmosphere for your mix.

Here is a list of the 10 Best Reverb VST Plugins…

1. FabFilter Pro-R ($199)

 

 

Fab Filter Pro-R is ​an extraordinarily realistic reverb.

A lot of the time, reverb may let the mix sounding muddy if you aren’t cautious. Or it could just sound weird and distract your listener. You won’t run into one of those difficulties with the Pro-R.

Whenever your tracks tend to include a lot of instruments, Pro-R might be a better bet for you.

This item sounds exceedingly clear, making best for vocalists or instruments that sound clean

2. Valhalla Room ($50)

 

 

Valhalla Room is a favorite of composers composing for orchestras and symphonies and excellent for producing large, wide rooms that sound rich and realistic. A must-have for anybody combining strings, choruses, woodwinds, and horns.

Initially, these strings sounded a bit dull. But by putting Valhalla Room onto them, they seem richer and three-dimensional. Also, it sounds excellent on pianos and everything that requires a huge ambient sound.

3. UAD Lexicon Digital Reverb 224 ($139)

 

 

Lexicon has produced some of the finest digital reverb units in history, even before the days of VSTs.

When digital technology was new, and many algorithmic reverbs were acceptable at most, Lexicon smashed all limits. The plugin’s interface, like the hardware module of the Lexicon 224, is a tactile slider style.

There are eight different reverbs and one chorus effect, all of which employ the same algorithms as the original hardware to offer you the exact sound you would receive if you had access to the hardware.

You will get more things like pitching the reverb shift and adjusting the input and output gain if you open the plugin.

If you want a natural and clean reverb without coloring, Lexicon 224 is for you.

4. Altiverb ($595)

 

 

Altiverb is by far the finest convolution reverb VST on the market.

A convolution reverb, Commonly known as an impulse response reverb, is a sample of an actual physical environment. Certain digital reverbs called algorithmic reverbs work via a set of mathematical algorithms to virtually recreate a space.

In the same manner that VSTs can characterize traditional reverb units, engineers are able to profile rooms. The software measures the way a place interacts with sound and generates a virtual environment based upon the gathered data.

Convolution reverb is by far the more realistic alternative to real-world reverb. Because of this, it is not typically utilized as an effect in the same way other reverbs are. Instead, it is an essential tool to the post sound engineer when recreating a particular setting for a film.

5. IQ Series Reverb ($299)

 

 

IQ Series is a convolution reverb with a very distinct taste. Something in the decay sounds a bit extraterrestrial, this reverb works best with sounds on guitars, pads, and background textures.
It provides a seductive mystery to the upper end of a mix. You may also achieve some pretty interesting effects with the Cut and Gate tools.

These are two alternative methods of gating the reverb. You may use them for strange, glitchy effects or to create a classic ‘80s snare sound.
It’s also effortless to load your impulse responses (called IR‘s). Just drag and drop them inside the plugin!

The positioner tool allows you to alter where the sound is originating from in the stereo field.
It’s also worth mentioning that convolution reverbs may be pricey. But IQ Series is inexpensive!

6. Kleverb ($59.99)

 

 

Klevgrand is a very inventive company, creating effects that are unique and wallet-friendly and Kleverb is no different.
Kleverb is an algorithmic reverb that sounds excellent on percussion, ambient textures, and electronic songs, and it ​lets you blend between early and late reflections.

You may simply control your reverb to sound close in one part and distant during another. All you have to do is adjust a single knob.
There’s also a ducker when you want the reverb to be softer while the instrument is playing. This is a fantastic method to check sure your reverb isn’t taking up too much room in the mix.

Kleverb is excellent for dreamy, far-away themes. And the additional features make it simple to implement minor adjustments that will keep your listeners interested. You simply have to be cautious with resonances.
It may wind up sounding a bit metallic owing to some upper mid resonance. But some basic EQing should help!

All in all, Kleverb is a great reverb that’s simple to use and is very cheap.

7. Adaptiverb ($249)

 

 

Zynaptiq is renowned for creating one-of-a-kind plugins utilizing cutting-edge technologies.
And Adaptiverb certainly lives true to its name!

This VST provides perceived depth, harmonic richness, and butter-smooth tails without obscuring the source.
It Maintains the tonal clarity and directness of your mix and adds size, glue, and body.

Adaptiverb produces reverb tails that blend in with the rest of your mix while also adding some interesting effects.
The Hold button transforms the reverb tail into a synth-like droning sound. You may also quantize the reverb tail’s pitch to achieve certain harmonies.

8. IR1 Convolution Reverb ($249)

 

 

Although Altiverb is an excellent reverb VST, it’s not particularly cheap and a bit excessive for most home studio settings. 

Because of this, we suggest Wave’s IR plugins when searching for top-quality, cost-effective convolution reverb.
IR1 enables the user to both shorten and prolong the reverb RT60 decay duration, modify the room size, apply sophisticated decay envelopes, highlight room mode resonances, adjust the damping and vary the relative volumes of the early reflections and the decay tail.

I can see how some of these things might be accomplished by using resynthesis techniques to extend or compress the impulse response, but the IR1 inventors have gone much further than this.

However, practically all these things are done by processing the impulse response itself since a new impulse response is computed after every adjustment – a process that takes a second or two.

9. Valhalla VintageVerb ($50)

 

 

Valhalla is renowned in the producer industry as the king of reverbs and unique effects. 

Let’s take a journey back to the colorful ‘70s and explore the warm places of the period with VintageVerb.
VintageVerb is Influenced by the traditional hardware of the 70s and 80s, this reverb plugin is the one to use if you’re searching for sound with attitude and character.

First, you can pick from 18 various reverb algorithms, ranging from rooms to sanctuaries and filthy plates. Next, paint your reverb with the style that defined that period.

Select 1970 for a deeper and louder reverb which may throw in the odd, random artifact in there. Go 1980 for a brighter sound. If you do not feel so daring. The “NOW” option, which offers you a pure reverb signal without color.

The basic UI layout changes the color between your specified settings from red to blue and contemporary black and grey. It’s simple to work with and customize to your taste.

10. Reverb SOLO (FREE)

 

 

Reverb.com and Acon Digital have partnered together to develop this amazing, FREE plugin.
Any producer knows that adding reverb could take a minute.

It’s easy to slip into a spiral when seeking the appropriate tone. You wind up wasting hours on something that should just take minutes.

Reverb SOLO is here to relieve you from mixing gridlock. With a mere two settings, Acon Digital has reduced reverb down to its bare essentials.

One knob controls the duration and tone of the reverb, while the other is a basic wet/dry knob.
Often sustaining your creative momentum is more vital than finding the right tone. Reverb SOLO is great for those moments when you simply want to put a reverb on and keep going.
It’s free, it’s quick, and it sounds good.

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